Weekly Reflections

Reflection for Feb. 18, 2018

Tuesday, February 13, 2018

God's everlasting covenant

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For the First Sunday of Lent, we are invited to set our eyes on God's enduring love and truth

by Sister Sally Ann Brickner

Today’s Scripture readings set the tone for our entire Lenten journey, which centers on our covenantal relationship with God. The passage from Genesis describes God’s fidelity to Noah and his family (and to us as well). God establishes a covenant and promises never again to destroy the earth and all it holds.  

In his first letter, St. Peter assures us that God’s covenant is renewed with us through our baptism when we are plunged into the life-giving waters – not of a flood – but of Christ’s own resurrection.  We are assured that in and through Christ we can overcome the powers of evil, whether they come from within ourselves or assail us from without.

St. Mark relates that before beginning His public ministry Jesus spent 40 days in the desert wrestling with temptations from Satan. By walking with our Risen Lord during these 40 days the grace of the Spirit will enable us to be true to our baptismal promises – to reject evil and the lure of Satan and to walk in newness of life.

Reflection questions
  1. What witness does Jesus provide for us in resisting evil, in casting out demons from our hearts?
  2. How true are you to your promises?
  3. What graces do you most deeply desire so that your covenantal relationship with God can be renewed?

 

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Reflection for Feb. 11, 2018

Thursday, February 8, 2018

'Be made clean'

In a move deemed risky by our standards, Jesus heals the leper; Can we take a risk for Him?

Jesus changed everything. In Sunday’s readings, the Old Testament describes what a leper must do – be declared unclean by a priest, live apart from others, and, if encountering others, cry out, “Unclean, unclean!”

Not so with Jesus. He takes pity on the leper. He touches the leper and heals him. Jesus then is the one who dwells in deserted places, apart from others. 

One encounter illustrates what Jesus is willing to do for us. What will we do for Him and others?

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Reflection for Feb. 4, 2018

Thursday, February 1, 2018

Verbal and nonverbal communications

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Preaching the Gospel at all times takes on many forms; here are a few ideas

by Sister Agnes Fischer

In today’s second reading St. Paul tells us, “Woe to me if I do not preach the Gospel.” So how do I do this?

  • I live my matrimony in such a way that I witness to those around me a true image of God’s love.
  • As a parent I show my children and grandchildren cause to really call God “Our Father”.
  • At home, school, factory, office, or business my enthusiasm to be a Christian is caught by those around me.

In other words, as Jesus says in today’s Gospel: “Let us go to nearby villages and preach there also.”

 

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Reflection for Jan. 28, 2018

Thursday, January 25, 2018

My peace I give to you

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The weight of guilt is lifted by confronting it and giving it to God

by Sister Elise Cholewinski

“There is something I once did in the past, and I feel very guilty about it.  I’ve never told anybody what I did; maybe sometime I will.”  Has anyone ever said that to you? Afraid and inwardly tormented by the guilt, the person eventually might come forth with the whole story.  The person might then feel a sense of relief and freedom, having shared the story with someone else. You might feel honored that the person trusted you to that degree.

“What do you have to do with us, Jesus of Nazareth?”  The man in the synagogue, troubled by an unclean spirit, recognized Jesus as the Holy One of God.  Why would Jesus want to have anything to do with him?  Yet Jesus commands the unclean spirit to leave the man, and the spirit departs.  The crowd was amazed; how much more amazed the man must have been, knowing that Jesus was not repulsed by his being unclean, but saw his inherent goodness and desired that he be at peace.

Sometimes the best way we can help people is to enable them to honestly confront the demons that roam around inside of them.  All it takes is listening.  In the end, we go away amazed.  We have honored their story; they have honored us with their trust.

 

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Reflection for Jan. 21, 2018

Thursday, January 18, 2018

Fight or flight

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No matter how imperfect our response is to Jesus' love He stands with us through it all

by Sister Annette Koss

In Sunday’s first reading, we see how Jonah responded to God’s call to go to Ninevah. He boarded a ship hoping to avoid God’s call. As we know, Jonah found himself being swallowed by a whale giving him time to reflect and pray. God saved him and he did go to Ninevah where his preaching converted the people.

In our Gospel, the disciples seem to follow Jesus almost blindly. They had no idea what they were getting into yet they dropped their nets and followed the Lord.  As they journeyed with Jesus, they found out what following Him really meant.   As it happened, they ran into the worst – the Passion and Crucifixion.  Later they experienced the best – the Resurrection.

We might run away like Jonah or run toward Jesus like the disciples did.  Either way, we will have some suffering.  We know that Jesus is with us throughout our lives, with us in our suffering and with us in our joys.  Each day we are asked to learn what love is really about and set our eyes on the goal of eternal life.

Prayer

Gracious God, you called to disciples and they left their nets.
When you called Jonah, he ran away.
We know that you call us, too.
Help us turn to you instead of running away.
We want to leave our boats, to drop our nets.
Help us let go, detach from everything.
Capture us in your net of eternal love.

 

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Reflection for Jan. 14, 2018

Wednesday, January 10, 2018

What are you looking for?

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Jesus' question should stir deep contemplation in your heart and mine

by Sister Madonna Swintkoske

In today’s Gospel John points out Jesus to two of his disciples.  As a true follower of Jesus he directs them to Jesus, not to himself.  His goal was to draw them to Christ.  There was no jealousy in him that they followed Jesus instead of him.

Jesus turns and addresses them with the question: “What are you looking for?"  Jesus met them half way.  He made it easier for them by opening the door for them with a question.  He was asking them about their heart’s desire.

Today I am invited to ask myself the question: What am I looking for?  What is my heart’s desire?  What am I trying to get out of life?

To answer the question I need to ask first (as Andrew and the disciple with him did), “Where are you (Christ) staying?"  I am not asked to speak on the road in passing as a chance acquaintance; but to linger longer, to “come and see”, to reflect about it with a loving God. Then in God’s loving embrace and mercy, and open to love I can respond to the question.

 

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Reflection for Jan. 7, 2018

Thursday, January 4, 2018

Starry, Starry Night

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A star led the Three Kings to the Lord of love; who lights the way for you?

by Sister Lynne Marie Simonich

Years ago I was traveling to the Upper Peninsula before Christmas.  There were two other Sisters with me as we journeyed north.  It was already dark and we were over half way to our destination when the headlights went out.  Anyone who has traveled north of Woodruff knows it is pretty desolate before reaching the next town.  I pulled off the road and we all got out of the car.  The darkness was all around us until we looked up into the sky.  Have you ever looked into the sky on a clear winter night away from the lights of the city?  It is truly an amazing sight.  The stars were everywhere –- glittering and dancing in the darkness!  After a few minutes, we all got back into the car.  We were all silent -– in awe of the beauty we had seen.  When I started the engine, the headlights came back on and we were able to continue on.  I have not forgotten the beauty of that night sky.

The three visitors in our Gospel on Sunday's Feast of the Epiphany, followed a star to find the Lord of love.  Would they have found him if they had not been guided by that star?  Didn’t the star lead them throughout  their journey?

As I reflected on the stars I saw and the star they saw I thought about all the “stars” in my life -– all the bright, shining stars that have helped me find my way to the Lord of love.  I know we all have those stars in our lives -- those who show us love, care, joy, compassion, hospitality, peace -– calling us to do the same as we journey together toward the Lord.  Would we find the Lord without them? 

Reflection questions:
  1. Who are the “stars” who have helped you find the Lord?
  2. How will you let those “stars” know that you have been touched by their light?
  3. Will you find time to go out on a clear winter night and look into that star-filled sky?

 

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Reflection for Jan. 1, 2018

Tuesday, December 26, 2017

Peace be with you

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As we celebrate Mary, the bearer of peace, can we work toward peace for 250 million people?

by Sister Sally Ann Brickner

On New Year’s Day the Church invites us to celebrate Mary, the Mother of God. Theotokos means God-bearer, which is a title that both Christians and Muslims ascribe to the Blessed Virgin Mary.  Our Mother Mary carried Christ in her womb, giving him physical life, and also imaged him in her relationships with others.

The title may be given to each of us also because, as we read in Genesis, we are created in God’s Image. Like Mary, we are God-bearers when we extend to others the greeting of peace in word and in action.

January 1 is also the World Day of Peace, and in his message for this day Pope Francis invites us to ponder how we are responding to the 250 million migrants and refugees in the world. Are we helping them in their search for peace? He urges us to take four actions toward migrants and refugees:

  • Welcome them by expanding legal pathways for entrance.
  • Protect them by defending their dignity as they search for freedom and peace.
  • Promote their development so that they can achieve their full human potential.
  • Integrate them fully into society as they contribute their unique gifts and talents.

As we begin the New Year, let us resolve to be God-bearers toward migrants and refugees in our midst who, like us, ardently long for peace.

 

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Reflection for Dec. 25, 2017

Wednesday, December 13, 2017

Holy and luminous action

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Christ's light is ours to receive and share with others

by Sister Laura Zelten

The Gospel for Christmas Day may surprise you. This reading is not one of the familiar Nativity narratives. Rather, this Gospel is the opening section of John’s Gospel, which begins with: “In the beginning was the Word.”

This first chapter of John's Gospel has inspired more theological writing than any other chapter of the Bible. John's Gospel begins with powerful words that make us think about who God is and what God is up to in the person of Jesus Christ.

Christmas is about light in the darkness. Picture a single candle. The background is black but in the center there's a small flame, brilliantly shining.  Christ is our light. As St. John says, "The light shone in the darkness and the darkness could not overcome it." There is a kind of boldness to the light. It lives in the darkness but the darkness cannot overcome it.  And maybe that's the thing. Maybe that's the Gospel writer's point. The light doesn't eliminate the darkness; the light is there helping to change the situation, making it better by being a constant, faithful presence.   This, I think, is the message of the Incarnation, the story behind the story that we will tell each other this day. God enters into the darkness to sit alongside of us as a caring advocate, a loving presence -- God with us -- Emmanuel.  God climbs right into the darkest places to be with us; in that holy and luminous action, we find reason to hope.

So, wherever there is darkness in your life, anywhere in our world, we can be absolutely sure that our God, our Emmanuel, is there, too -- a Light in our darkness. And because we are in relationship with God who is Light, THE Source of the Light, we, too, are called to be Light.

Reflection questions
  • Where do you find the light of Jesus?
  • How are you called to be light to others this Christmas season?

 

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Reflection for Dec. 17, 2017

Wednesday, December 13, 2017

Rejoice, rejoice!

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Third week of Advent encourages us to carry a message of joy and hope to others

by Sister Rose Jochmann

Can you believe it?  Christmas is 10 days away!  How is your Advent preparation going?  Advent is such a short church season.  Have you taken time to remember what the season is about?  We are celebrating that Jesus, the Son of God, came to live among as a human being.  We are celebrating that Jesus continues to live with each of us.

In church this weekend, you will notice that the pink Advent candle is lit.  The pink candle tells us it is time to rejoice. The Entrance Antiphon says, “Rejoice in the Lord always; again I say, rejoice. Indeed, the Lord is near.”  This gives us a hint regarding the emphasis of the week. The first reading reminds us of the real reason for the Christmas season, “I rejoice heartily in the Lord, in my God is the joy of my soul.”  The second reading continues the same theme, “Brothers and sisters: Rejoice always.”  And the Gospel speaks about John the Baptist who was preaching “Good News to the people”.

So, as you finish your preparations for Christmas, don’t let yourself get stressed and anxious.  Remember that the Lord is near, the Lord is with you. Rejoice!  Bring that Good News to the people you meet.

 

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